Fishing Knots

How to Tie a World Fair Knot

The World Fair Knot is a useful addition to your fishing knot arsenal. It is very strong and can be used to attach terminal tackle. It received its name because it was first demonstrated at the 1982 Knoxville World’s Fair in a competition between 498 entries for Dupont’s “Best New Knot” prize. Gary L. Martin of Lafayette, Indiana took home the top prize when he demonstrated this knot at the fair. It was chosen as the winner because it is very simple to understand, easy to tie, and can be used for a variety of different purposes in fishing and the outdoors. The Dupont Corp’s Great Knot Search Panel determined that of the 498 entries, his was the best. Many pro bass fishermen will use the World Fair Knot as a means of tying drop shot rigs by leaving the tag end to the desired length that matches the weight that will be attached to it. It is easy to tie using either a monofilament or fluorocarbon line, so it can be easily added to any fishing tackle tool kit. It is also strong and dependable, two traits that really are necessary when using a new fishing tackle knot.
 
Step 1:
Fold the end of the monofilament or fluorocarbon line back on itself and create a loop that is about six inches long.
 

Step 2:
 Thread the loop through the eye of your tackle, leaving a section protruding outwards.

Step 3:
Fold the extra section of the loop backwards over the tackle so that it covers the double line of your fishing thread.

Step 4:
Pull the doubled line back through the loop then pull the tag, or active, end underneath the doubled line and over to the opposing side of the loop. This will form a new loop.

Step 5:
 Pass the tag end through the new loop. Moisten the line with water and finish off the knot with firm but not hard pressure on the standing line (the part not being used to create the knot). You can clip off any excess line from the edge of the knot.

Our Take:

You now have a World Fair Knot and are ready to start fishing with it.
Carla Arbuckle

Carla is a staff writer for Fishing.org and Shooting.org. She is an avid outdoors enthusiast and photographer. She can be found most weekends fishing and exploring the wilderness.